Dissertation Writing

Writing a dissertation is no easy task. This site is devoted to solving the mystery of writing a perfect dissertation.

Dissertation Editing

Have already written your dissertation? Learn how to polish it up using simple, though valuable tips and tricks.


Dissertation Writing Problems

  • Research proposal writing
  • Writing a rationale
  • Theoretical framework
  • Reviewing the literature
  • Methodology section
  • Data gathering
  • Discussion & conclusion
  • Presentational issues
  • Dissertation editing & proofreading

Dissertation resources



5 Tips for Writing a Dissertation Proposal

In many ways, students don’t know what to expect when they’re writing a dissertation proposal. For most, it’s the first document of its kind to come their way. They can’t just write up an essay on the topic they’re addressing and pass it off. Proposals are much more unique and specific than most other academic assignments. Students struggling with dissertation proposals, however, need only remember a few simple tips in order to compose a quality proposal. These tips include:

  • Pick something that excites you. When students select dissertations topics that don’t actually spark their interest, you can tell immediately. Writing is dry, things are patched together and ideas generally don’t flow. To aid yourself in writing a great dissertation proposal, pick something you’ll actually want to write about. This won’t just help you craft an enchanting proposal, but it will help sustain you through your dissertation writing further down the road.
  • Clarify your argument. Students sometimes get swept up in trying to write an impressive, linguistically elegant proposal with lots of great points and interesting thoughts. When this happens, they can completely forget to clarify their main intent. Make sure your reason and methodology for the dissertation is clear. The proposal should easily describe what you are trying to argue and how you are going to do it.
  • Stay organized. Make sure everything is easy to follow, from your proposed argument to your methodology to your paper’s tentative outline. A proposal’s basic function is to inform the reader on what a paper is about, what it is trying to prove and how it will prove it. Consider these ideas when making your proposal; keep it neat, clean and easy to understand.
  • Don’t pour too much into your proposal. A dissertation proposal is a tentative plan for your paper – not the paper itself. Students want to sometimes pour all of their thoughts, evidence and support into a proposal as though to justify the paper right off the bat. You don’t want to do this. Your proposal should explain your topic and what you are planning to do or prove. Leave the actual proving to the paper; this is just your provisional plan.
  • Talk to your professor. Always, always, always consult your professor. They are the ones who will be reading your proposal, so it’s their input and approval you’ll need most. Show them your rough drafts and reveal your general idea; ask them for advice. They’ve likely seen dissertation proposals before and know how to help you through this one. Don’t be afraid to go to a professor; nine times out of ten, they're friendly and willing to help.
  • Updated on September 21st, 2012 | §Permalink